CSO launches call for the fair channeling of Special Drawing Rights / OSC lanza llamado para la canalización justa de los Derechos Especiales de Giro

Comparte en redes sociales

Texto en castellano: EN ESTE ENLACE

Texte français: DANS CE LIEN

نص بالعربية: في هذا الرابط

Open Letter to G20 Finance Ministers, Central Bank Governors and the IMF: Civil Society Organizations Call for Principles for Fair Channeling of Special Drawing Rights

As the pandemic exacerbates multiple crises in developing countries, Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) are a crucial option to help finance the COVID response and hasten an equitable and inclusive economic recovery. With the SDR distribution being proportional to IMF countries’ quotas, the new allocation of US$650 billion does not ensure sufficient SDRs go to developing countries. This is why many have been calling for an allocation in the order of US$3 trillion. Moreover, advanced economies are in less need of SDRs given their access to a wider array of monetary and financial tools for the response and recovery. Thus, it is essential that the recent allocation be quickly followed by rechanneling a significant portion of advanced economies’ SDRs to developing countries.

We strongly believe that successful and equitable recovery is contingent on transparency and a participatory process inclusive of civil society in all countries. This also applies to international spaces making decisions on SDR channeling mechanisms, including the G20 and the IMF, where civil society has not had, so far, sufficient opportunities to engage on this matter.

We urge you to ensure SDR channeling options align with a basic framework of principles that many academics, experts and civil society colleagues around the world echoed over recent months.

THE CHANNELING OPTIONS SHOULD:

  1. Provide debt-free financing, so it does not add to unsustainable debt burdens of developing countries, whose annual external public debt payments are projected to average US$300 billion over 2021 and 2022. Grant-based financing is ideal but, if additional loans are to be offered, then maximum concessionality is critical (zero interest and lengthy repayment terms with extended grace periods).
  2. Refrain from tying transfers to policy conditionality (directly or indirectly). Conditionality will lengthen the time it takes to negotiate such financing, could force countries into adopting difficult adjustment or austerity measures; or put the financing beyond reach for countries unable to comply with such conditions.
  3. Be accessible to middle-income countries. These countries have persistently been left out of debt relief initiatives and concessional financing, and should not be excluded from yet another financial assistance option when many of them face deep debt distress and challenging pandemic vulnerabilities.
  4. Include transparency and accountability safeguards on both providers and recipients of such financing in the spirit of democratic ownership, strengthening independent scrutiny, participation and accountability to citizens.
  5. Ensure that SDR contributions are additional to existing ODA and climate finance commitments. Only SDRs channelled to developing countries as grants should count as ODA, or, where appropriate, against the climate finance goal of US$100 billion.
  6. Prioritize SDR use that expands international grant funding for combatting the pandemic through budget support for public services and the public sector workforce in health and education, for social protection and other needs. Grants can also target promotion of a fair recovery that supports climate justice, and tackles economic and gender inequality, including the unpaid care burden that women bear, and the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated.

We also call for agreement on a global repository to report on channeled SDRs. This will help limit fragmentation and be an important measure for accountability of commitments and tracking the overall impact of SDRs, including for ongoing learning.

We are aware that the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (PRGT) is being considered as a favoured option for SDRs channeling; however, it is important to note that the PRGT does not reflect the principles of being debt-free, conditionality-free, and accessible to all developing countries. We urge you to consider ways to improve the PRGT option, including channeling via its emergency financing vehicle (Rapid Credit Facility).

We also encourage you to identify SDR channeling mechanisms that support debt cancellation, including through the Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust, and to consider alternative options which align best with the principles stated above.

To create options to scale up SDR channeling volumes and reach more developing countries we encourage you to seriously discuss alternative options beyond the PRGT and beyond the IMF more broadly. However, other rechanneling vehicles under discussion, such as a Resilience and Sustainability Trust and Multilateral Development Banks, still appear far from embodying these principles.

Finally, neither the initial SDR allocation nor the channeling of SDRs can be a substitute for the urgent implementation of debt relief measures that benefit both low- and middle- income countries, especially to ensure that the additional resources are not directed to repay external private and other creditors.

 

SIGNATORIES

REGIONAL / GLOBAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. Access to Human Rights International AHRI
  2. Action Aid International
  3. ACTIONS PLURIELLES
  4. Advocacy Initiative for Development (AID)
  5. Africa Network for Environment and Economic Justice(ANEEJ)
  6. African Forum and Network on Debt and Development AFRODAD
  7. African Women’s Development and Communication Network(FEMNET)
  8. AidWatch Canada
  9. Alliance for Sustainable Development Organization (ASDO)
  10. Arab Watch Coalition
  11. Associated Country Women of the World
  12. Association Biowa
  13. AULA TIDEs UN SDGs Action Education & Programming
  14. Blue Ridge Impact Consulting
  15. Both ENDS
  16. Bretton Woods Project
  17. Burundi Rugby League Rugby a XIII Cooperative, Central & East Africa
  18. Campaign for Human Rights and Development International CHRDI, Sierra Leone West Africa
  19. Campaña Latinoamericana por el Derecho a la Educación (CLADE)
  20. Candid Concepts Development
  21. Caritas Ghana
  22. Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR)
  23. Christian Aid
  24. Civil Society Action Coalition on Education for All
  25. Coalition for Health Workers (HRH PLUS)
  26. Confederation of Indonesia People Movement (KPRI)
  27. Coordinadora de Organizaciones de Desarrollo
  28. DAWN (Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era)
  29. Derecho Ambiente y Recursos Naturales DAR
  30. Development Alternatives
  31. Diverse Voices and Action (DIVA) for Equality
  32. Ekumenická akademie (Ecumenical Academy)
  33. Equidad de Género: Ciudadanía, Trabajo y Familia
  34. Estonian Roundtable for Development Cooperation
  35. European Network on Debt and Development EURODAD
  36. Feminist Task Force
  37. FENASSEP/ISP, SINERGIE DES TRAVAILLEURS DU TOGO/STT
  38. Fight Inequality Alliance
  39. Fight Inequality Alliance, Asia
  40. Financial Transparency Coalition
  41. FOKUS – Forum for Women and Development
  42. Fundacion para Estudio e Investigacion de la Mujer
  43. Fundación para la Democracia Internacional
  44. Fundacion SES
  45. Gender and Development Network
  46. Génération Maastricht
  47. Geneva Finance Observatory
  48. Global Campaign for Education
  49. Global Coalition Against Poverty GCAP
  50. Global Policy Forum
  51. Global Socio-economic and Financial Evolution Network (GSFEN)
  52. Global Youth Online Union
  53. Health Action International Asia Pacific
  54. Indigenous Peoples Global Forum for Sustainable Development, (International Indegeous Platforme)
  55. Institute for Economic Justice
  56. Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Loreto Generalate
  57. Internacional de Servicios Públicos (ISP)
  58. International Council for Adult Education
  59. International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific (IWRAW Asia Pacific)
  60. Jubilee Debt Campaign
  61. Jubilee USA Network
  62. Ladies of Great Decorum
  63. Latin American Network for Economic and Social Rights -LATINDADD
  64. Latinoamérica Sustentable
  65. Medicus Mundi Mediterrània
  66. Medicusmundi spain
  67. Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate
  68. Mumahhid Family of Greater Jerusalem
  69. MY World Mexico
  70. NGO CSW LAC
  71. Okogun Odigie Safewomb International Foundation (OOSAIF)
  72. OXFAM
  73. Plateforme française Dette et Développement (PFDD)
  74. Red de Justicia Fiscal para América Latina y El Caribe RJFALC
  75. Regions Refocus
  76. RIPESS
  77. SAUDI GREEN BUILDING FORUM
  78. Save the Children
  79. SEATINI
  80. SEDRA, Chile
  81. Seed Global Health
  82. Servicios Ecumenios para Reconciliacion y Reconstuccion
  83. Sisters of Charity Federation
  84. Social Justice in Global Development
  85. Society for International Development SID
  86. Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future
  87. Stop the Bleeding Campaign
  88. Success Capital Organisation
  89. The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation
  90. Third World Network
  91. Tripla Difesa Onlus ODV
  92. UDA LLP
  93. UGANDA DEBT NETWORK
  94. UNISC International
  95. Unite for Climate Action
  96. United Religions Initiative
  97. WaterAid
  98. Wemos
  99. Womankind
  100. Women Coalition for Agenda 2030
  101. World Future Council
  102. World Public Health Nutrition Association
  103. Zamara Foundation

 

NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. AbibiNsroma Foundation, Ghana
  2. Academic and Career Development Initiative, Cameroon
  3. Africa Development Interchange Network (ADIN), Cameroon
  4. Alliance Sud, Switzerland
  5. Al-Tahreer Association for Development, Iraq
  6. American TelePhysicians, USA
  7. Apostle Padi Ologo Traditional Birth Centre, Ghana
  8. Asociación Ciudadana por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina
  9. Association for Promotion Sustainable Development, India
  10. Association of Rural Education and Development Service, India
  11. Baghdad Women Association, Iraq
  12. Bahrain Transparency
  13. Budget Advocacy Network, Sierra Leone
  14. Catholic Agency for Overseas Development CAFOD, UK
  15. CCFD-Terre Solidaire
  16. CDES, Ecuador
  17. CEDECAM, Nicaragua
  18. Cedetrabajo, Colombia
  19. CEICOM, El Salvador
  20. Center for Economic and Policy Research, CEPR
  21. Centre for Environmental Justice, Sri Lanka
  22. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  23. CLATE/ULATOC/CTA-A, España
  24. Club Ohada Thies, Senegal
  25. CNCD-11.11.11
  26. Comisión Nacional de Enlace
  27. Community Working Group on Health (CWGH), Zimbabwe
  28. Conservation and Development Agency CODEA-CBO, Uganda
  29. Consumer Unity and Trust Society (CUTS), Zambia
  30. Cooperation for Peace and Development (CPD), Afghanistan
  31. Corporación CIASE
  32. Debt Justice Norway
  33. Campaña por la Expresión ciudadana
  34. DSW Kenya
  35. Economic Justice Network Sierra Leone
  36. EMPOWER INDIA
  37. ENVIRONICS TRUST, India
  38. de
  39. Fair Trade Hellas, Greece
  40. Fomento de la Vida- FOVIDA, Peru
  41. Foro Social de Deuda Externa y Desarrollo de Honduras – FOSDEH, Honduras
  42. Forum Solidaridad Perú
  43. Foundation for Environmental Management and CampaignAgainst Poverty, Tanzania
  44. Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
  45. Friends of the Earth US
  46. Fundación Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (FARN)
  47. Fundación Constituyente XXI, Chile
  48. Gatef organizations, Egypt
  49. GCAP El Salvador
  50. GCAP Italia
  51. GCAP Rwanda Coalition
  52. German NGO Forum on Environment and Development
  53. Gestos (soropositividade, comunicação, gênero), Brazil
  54. Global Justice Now
  55. Global Learning for Sustainability, Uganda
  56. Global Responsibility (AG Globale Verantwortung)
  57. GreenTech Foundation, Bangladesh
  58. GreenWatch Dhaka, Bangladesh
  59. Group of Action, Peace and Training for Transformation – GAPAFOT, Central African Republic
  60. GWEN Trust, Zimbabwe
  61. Help Age, India
  62. Institute for Public Policy Research, Namibia
  63. Instituto de Estudos Socioeconomicos, Brazil
  64. Instituto Equit – Genero, Economia e Cidadania Global,Brazil
  65. Instituto Guatemalteco de Economistas, Guatemala
  66. Iraqi center for women rehabilitation & employment, Iraq
  67. Iraqi Institute for the Civil Development(IICD), Iraq
  68. Jubilee Debt Campaign -UK
  69. JUBILEO 2OOO RED ECUADOR
  70. U.L.U.- Women and Developmennt, Denmark
  71. Kathak Academy (KA)
  72. Kulmiye Aid Foundation, Somalia
  73. Lanka Fundamental Rights Organization, Sri Lanka
  74. Marikana youth development organisation, South Africa
  75. Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop, Guatemala
  76. Myanmar Youth foundation for SDG, Myanmar
  77. National Association of Professional Environmentalists(NAPE), Uganda
  78. National Campaign for Sustainable Development Nepal
  79. National Confederation of Dalit and Adivasi Organisations (NACDAOR), India
  80. National Labour Academy, Nepal
  81. National Society of Conservationists – Friends of the Earth Hungary
  82. NCD Alliance in Georgia
  83. Nepal Development Initiative (NEDI), Nepal
  84. Network of Journalists Living with HIV (JONEHA), Malawi
  85. New Millennium Women Empowerment Organization, Ethiopia
  86. NGO Federation of Nepal
  87. Nkoko Iju Africa, Kenya
  88. Observatorio Mexicano de la Crisis, Mexico
  89. Okoa Uchumi Campaign, Kenya
  90. ONG Cooperación y Desarrollo, Guinea Ecuatorial
  91. ONG Espoir Pour Tous, Côte d’Ivoire
  92. Ong FEED, Niger
  93. ONG PADJENA, Benin
  94. ONG Santé et Action Globale, Togo
  95. Organisation des Femmes Aveugles du Bénin
  96. Pakistan Development Alliance
  97. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  98. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  99. Pakistan Kissan Rabita Committee
  100. Peoples Development Institute, Phillippines
  101. POSCO-Agenda 2030 Senegal
  102. PROGRÈS SOCIAUX, Benin
  103. Rapad Maroc, Morocco
  104. REACHOUT SALONE, Sierra Leone
  105. REBRIP – Rede Brasileira pela Integração dos Povos, Brazil
  106. Recourse, The Netherlands
  107. Red Dot Foundation Global, USA
  108. Red Dot Foundation, India
  109. Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio (RMALC)
  110. RENICC Nicaragua
  111. RIHRDO (Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource Development Organization )
  112. Rural Area Development Programme (RADP), Nepal
  113. Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource development Organization (RIHRDO), Pakistan
  114. SAFE EMPOWERED COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATION ZAMBIA
  115. Sisters of Charity Federation
  116. Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre, Tanzania
  117. Solidarité des femmes pour le Développement intégral (SOFEDI), R. D. Congo
  118. Somali Youth Development Foundation (SYDF), Somalia
  119. Sorouh for Sustainable Development Foundation-SSDF, Iraq
  120. Stamp Out Poverty
  121. State Employees Federation, Mauritius
  122. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, India
  123. SYNAPECOCI, Côte d’Ivoire
  124. Tanzania Coalition on Debt and Development (TCDD)
  125. Tax Justice Network US
  126. The Institute for Social Accountability, Kenya
  127. The Mango Tree, Kenya
  128. The Rural Sector Public Institution CBO and Affiliated Entity’s With Multiple Distinct Components, Bangladesh
  129. Toto Centre Initiative, Kenya
  130. Treat Every Environment Special Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
  131. Uganda Peace Foundation
  132. UIMS, Iraq
  133. UndebtedWorld, Greece
  134. Union des Amis Socio Culturels d’Action en Developpement (UNASCAD), Haiti
  135. Uso Inteligente ASV A.C., México
  136. VEILLE CITOYENNE TOGO
  137. Wada Na Todo Abhiyan, India
  138. WEED – World Economy, Ecology & Development e.V.
  139. Western Kenya LBQT Feminist Forum (Lets Be Tested Queens CBO)
  140. WIPGG Nigeria
  141. WomanHealth Philippines
  142. Women in Democracy and Governance (WIDAG), Kenya
  143. Working With Women, Cameroun
  144. WREPA, Kenya
  145. Za Zemiata, Friends of the Earth Bulgaria
  146. Zukunftskonvent Germany
  147. منظمة حواد للاغاثة والتنمية

 

ACADEMICS / RESEARCHERS

  1. Ahmad Mahdavi, University of Tehran/ and Sustainable agriculture and environment
  2. Albert Gyan, Social Advocate (African Diaspora)
  3. Annina Kaltenbrunner, Leeds University Business School UK
  4. Brenda Awuor Odongo, Researcher on SRHR and Reproductive health
  5. Claudio Schuftan, Researcher on human rights
  6. Daniel Bradlow, Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law
  7. Daniel Ortega-Pacheco, Center for Public Policy Development, ESPOL Polytechnic University, Ecuador
  8. Adamu Abdullazeez Bako, Centre for Citizens Rights
  9. Elisa Van Waeyenberge, SOAS University of London
  10. Frances Stewart, University of Oxford
  11. Gabriele Koehler, Researcher on 2030 Agenda eco-eco-social state, Germany
  12. Gerry Helleiner, Prof. emeritus, Economics, University of Toronto
  13. Grupo de Investigación en Derechos Colectivos y Ambientales GIDCA, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
  14. Ilene Grabel, Distinguished University Professor, Josef Korbel School of International Studies
  15. Jorge Manuel Gil, Cátedra libre pensamiento latinoamericano, UNPSJB
  16. Kevin P Gallagher, Global Development Policy Center, Boston University, USA
  17. Lena Dominelli, University of Southampton, UK
  18. María José Lubertino Beltrán, Profesora de Derechos Humanos, Universidad de Buenos Aires
  19. Martin S. Edwards, Seton Hall University, School of Diplomacy and International Relations
  20. Matthew Martin, Development Finance International
  21. Michel Aglietta, emeritus professor in economics, Centre for Prospective Studies and International Information CEPII
  22. Nora Fernández Mora, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
  23. Oscar Ugarteche, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas, México
  24. Remco van de Pas, Researcher on public health at ITM
  25. Rick Rowden, Lecturer, American University in Washington DC
  26. Rungani Aaron, Researcher, Zimbabwe
  27. Sandra Janice Misiribi, Good Health Community Project
  28. Shem Atuya Ayiera, ST. HEMMINGWAYS NGO
  29. Spyros Marchetos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  30. Viktor Chistyakov, Columbia University

 


Text in English: CLICK HERE

 

Carta abierta a los Ministros de Finanzas del G20, los gobernadores de los bancos centrales y el FMI: las organizaciones de la sociedad civil piden principios para la canalización justa de los Derechos Especiales de Giro

 

A medida que la pandemia agrava múltiples crisis en los países en desarrollo, los Derechos Especiales de Giro (DEG) son una opción crucial para ayudar a financiar la respuesta frente al COVID y para acelerar una recuperación económica equitativa e inclusiva. Dado que la distribución de los DEG es proporcional a la cuota, una asignación de 650.000 millones de dólares no garantiza que se destinen suficientes DEG a los países en desarrollo. Es por eso que muchos han pedido una asignación del orden de 3 billones de dólares. Además, las economías avanzadas tienen menos necesidad de DEG debido a que gozan del acceso a una gama más amplia de herramientas monetarias y financieras para la recuperación. Por lo tanto, es fundamental que adicionalmente a la reciente asignación, le siga una rápida reorientación de una porción sigfnificativa de los DEG de las economías avanzadas hacia los países en desarrollo.

Creemos firmemente que la recuperación exitosa y equitativa depende de la transparencia y de un proceso participativo que incluya a la sociedad civil, en todos los países, pero también en los espacios internacionales de toma de decisiones sobre los mecanismos de canalización de los DEG, incluidos el G20 y el FMI, dentro de los cuales no hemos tenido aún oportunidad suficiente de participar.

Instamos a ustedes a asegurarse que las opciones de canalización de DEG se encuentren alineadas a un marco básico de principios sobre el cual muchos académicos, expertos y colegas de la sociedad civil de todo el mundo han hecho eco durante los últimos meses.

LAS OPCIONES DE CANALIZACIÓN DEBERÍAN:

  1. Proporcionar financiación libre de deudas, de modo que no se sume a la carga insostenible de la deuda de los países en desarrollo, cuyos pagos proyectados anuales de deuda externa alcanzarán 300.000 millones de dólares el 2021 y 2022. El financiamiento basado en donaciones es ideal pero, si se van a ofrecer préstamos adicionales, entonces la máxima concesionalidad es fundamental (cero intereses y plazos de pago prolongados con extendidos períodos de gracia).
  1. Abstenerse de vincular las transferencias a las condicionalidades de las políticas (directa o indirectamente). La condicionalidad alargará el tiempo que lleva negociar dicho financiamiento, podría forzar a los países a implementar medidas de ajuste o austeridad, o convertir a este financiamiento en inalcanzable para países que no puedan cumplir con tales condiciones.
  1. Ser accesible para los países de ingreso medio. Estos países han sido mantenidos constantemente al margen de las iniciativas de alivio de la deuda y del financiamiento en condiciones favorables, y no deberían ser excluidos de otra opción de asistencia financiera, pues muchos de ellos enfrentan un profundo sobreendeudamiento y desafiantes vulnerabilidades por la pandemia.
  1. Incluir salvaguardas de transparencia y rendición de cuentas en países proveedores y receptores en este mecanismo, un espíritu de propiedad democrática, fortaleciendo el escrutinio independiente, la participación y la rendición de cuentas hacia los ciudadanos.
  1. Asegurar que las contribuciones de DEG sean adicionales a los compromisos existentes de Ayuda Oficial al Desarrollo (AOD, por sus siglas en inglés) y al financiamiento climático. Solo los DEG canalizados a los países en desarrollo como donaciones deberían contarse como AOD, o, cuando corresponda, a cuenta del objetivo de financiación climática de 100.000 millones de dólares.
  1. Priorizar el uso de DEG que amplía la financiación de subvenciones internacionales para combatir la pandemia a través del apoyo presupuestario para los servicios públicos y para la fuerza de trabajo del sector público en salud y educación, para protección social y otras necesidades. Las donaciones también pueden apuntar a la promoción de una recuperación justa que apoye la justicia climática y aborde la desigualdad económica y de género, incluyendo la carga de cuidados no remunerados que soportan las mujeres, la cual se ha visto agravada por la pandemia de COVID-19.

También pedimos un acuerdo sobre un repositorio global para informar sobre los DEG canalizados. Esto ayudaría a limitar la fragmentación y sería una medida importante para la rendición de cuentas de los compromisos, así como para realizar el seguimiento de los impactos de los DEG, incluyendo además un aprendizaje continuo.

Somos conscientes de que el Fondo Fiduciario para el Crecimiento y la Lucha contra la Pobreza (PRGT, por sus siglas en inglés) está siendo considerado como una opción privilegiada para la canalización de DEG; sin embargo, es importante señalar que el PRGT no refleja los principios de libre de ser un financiameinto libre de deudas, libre de condicionalidades y accesible para todos los países en desarrollo. Instamos a ustedes a considerar formas de mejorar la opción PRGT, incluyendo la canalización de recursos a través de su vehículo de financiamiento de emergencia (Línea de Crédito Rápida).

También los alentamos a identificar los mecanismos de canalización de DEG que respalden la cancelación de la deuda, incluso a través del Fondo Fiduciario para Alivio y Contención de Catástrofes (CCRT), y a considerar opciones alternativas que se alineen mejor con los principios establecidos anteriormente.

Con el fin de crear opciones para aumentar los volúmenes de canalización de DEG y llegar a más países en desarrollo, los alentamos a discutir seriamente las opciones alternativas más allá del PRGT y más allá del FMI. Además, es importante mencionar que otros vehículos de recanalización en discusión, como el Fideicomiso de Resiliencia y Sostenibilidad y los Bancos Multilaterales de Desarrollo, aún están lejos de incorporar estos principios.

Por último, ni la asignación inicial de DEG ni la canalización de DEG pueden sustituir la implementación urgente de medidas de alivio de la deuda que beneficien tanto a los países de ingresos bajos como a los de ingresos medios, especialmente para garantizar que los recursos adicionales no se destinen a reembolsar a los acreedores privados externos y otros acreedores.

Si desea añadir su firma, por favor complete este formulario: https://forms.gle/BFsUMjQPTLdxokiL9

 

ADHERENTES:

REGIONAL / ORGANIZACIONES GLOBALES

  1. Access to Human Rights International AHRI
  2. Action Aid International
  3. ACTIONS PLURIELLES
  4. Advocacy Initiative for Development (AID)
  5. Africa Network for Environment and Economic Justice(ANEEJ)
  6. African Forum and Network on Debt and Development AFRODAD
  7. African Women’s Development and Communication Network(FEMNET)
  8. AidWatch Canada
  9. Alliance for Sustainable Development Organization (ASDO)
  10. Arab Watch Coalition
  11. Associated Country Women of the World
  12. Association Biowa
  13. AULA TIDEs UN SDGs Action Education & Programming
  14. Blue Ridge Impact Consulting
  15. Both ENDS
  16. Bretton Woods Project
  17. Burundi Rugby League Rugby a XIII Cooperative, Central & East Africa
  18. Campaign for Human Rights and Development International CHRDI, Sierra Leone West Africa
  19. Campaña Latinoamericana por el Derecho a la Educación (CLADE)
  20. Candid Concepts Development
  21. Caritas Ghana
  22. Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR)
  23. Christian Aid
  24. Civil Society Action Coalition on Education for All
  25. Coalition for Health Workers (HRH PLUS)
  26. Confederation of Indonesia People Movement (KPRI)
  27. Coordinadora de Organizaciones de Desarrollo
  28. DAWN (Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era)
  29. Derecho Ambiente y Recursos Naturales DAR
  30. Development Alternatives
  31. Diverse Voices and Action (DIVA) for Equality
  32. Ekumenická akademie (Ecumenical Academy)
  33. Equidad de Género: Ciudadanía, Trabajo y Familia
  34. Estonian Roundtable for Development Cooperation
  35. European Network on Debt and Development EURODAD
  36. Feminist Task Force
  37. FENASSEP/ISP, SINERGIE DES TRAVAILLEURS DU TOGO/STT
  38. Fight Inequality Alliance
  39. Fight Inequality Alliance, Asia
  40. Financial Transparency Coalition
  41. FOKUS – Forum for Women and Development
  42. Fundacion para Estudio e Investigacion de la Mujer
  43. Fundación para la Democracia Internacional
  44. Fundacion SES
  45. Gender and Development Network
  46. Génération Maastricht
  47. Geneva Finance Observatory
  48. Global Campaign for Education
  49. Global Coalition Against Poverty GCAP
  50. Global Policy Forum
  51. Global Socio-economic and Financial Evolution Network (GSFEN)
  52. Global Youth Online Union
  53. Health Action International Asia Pacific
  54. Indigenous Peoples Global Forum for Sustainable Development, (International Indegeous Platforme)
  55. Institute for Economic Justice
  56. Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Loreto Generalate
  57. Internacional de Servicios Públicos (ISP)
  58. International Council for Adult Education
  59. International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific (IWRAW Asia Pacific)
  60. Jubilee Debt Campaign
  61. Jubilee USA Network
  62. Ladies of Great Decorum
  63. Latin American Network for Economic and Social Rights -LATINDADD
  64. Latinoamérica Sustentable
  65. Medicus Mundi Mediterrània
  66. Medicusmundi spain
  67. Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate
  68. Mumahhid Family of Greater Jerusalem
  69. MY World Mexico
  70. NGO CSW LAC
  71. Okogun Odigie Safewomb International Foundation (OOSAIF)
  72. OXFAM
  73. Plateforme française Dette et Développement (PFDD)
  74. Red de Justicia Fiscal para América Latina y El Caribe RJFALC
  75. Regions Refocus
  76. RIPESS
  77. SAUDI GREEN BUILDING FORUM
  78. Save the Children
  79. SEATINI
  80. SEDRA, Chile
  81. Seed Global Health
  82. Servicios Ecumenios para Reconciliacion y Reconstuccion
  83. Sisters of Charity Federation
  84. Social Justice in Global Development
  85. Society for International Development SID
  86. Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future
  87. Stop the Bleeding Campaign
  88. Success Capital Organisation
  89. The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation
  90. Third World Network
  91. Tripla Difesa Onlus ODV
  92. UDA LLP
  93. UGANDA DEBT NETWORK
  94. UNISC International
  95. Unite for Climate Action
  96. United Religions Initiative
  97. WaterAid
  98. Wemos
  99. Womankind
  100. Women Coalition for Agenda 2030
  101. World Future Council
  102. World Public Health Nutrition Association
  103. Zamara Foundation

 

ORGANIZACIONES NACIONALES

  1. AbibiNsroma Foundation, Ghana
  2. Academic and Career Development Initiative, Cameroon
  3. Africa Development Interchange Network (ADIN), Cameroon
  4. Alliance Sud, Switzerland
  5. Al-Tahreer Association for Development, Iraq
  6. American TelePhysicians, USA
  7. Apostle Padi Ologo Traditional Birth Centre, Ghana
  8. Asociación Ciudadana por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina
  9. Association for Promotion Sustainable Development, India
  10. Association of Rural Education and Development Service, India
  11. Baghdad Women Association, Iraq
  12. Bahrain Transparency
  13. Budget Advocacy Network, Sierra Leone
  14. Catholic Agency for Overseas Development CAFOD, UK
  15. CCFD-Terre Solidaire
  16. CDES, Ecuador
  17. CEDECAM, Nicaragua
  18. Cedetrabajo, Colombia
  19. CEICOM, El Salvador
  20. Center for Economic and Policy Research, CEPR
  21. Centre for Environmental Justice, Sri Lanka
  22. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  23. CLATE/ULATOC/CTA-A, España
  24. Club Ohada Thies, Senegal
  25. CNCD-11.11.11
  26. Comisión Nacional de Enlace
  27. Community Working Group on Health (CWGH), Zimbabwe
  28. Conservation and Development Agency CODEA-CBO, Uganda
  29. Consumer Unity and Trust Society (CUTS), Zambia
  30. Cooperation for Peace and Development (CPD), Afghanistan
  31. Corporación CIASE
  32. Debt Justice Norway
  33. Campaña por la Expresión ciudadana
  34. DSW Kenya
  35. Economic Justice Network Sierra Leone
  36. EMPOWER INDIA
  37. ENVIRONICS TRUST, India
  38. de
  39. Fair Trade Hellas, Greece
  40. Fomento de la Vida- FOVIDA, Peru
  41. Foro Social de Deuda Externa y Desarrollo de Honduras – FOSDEH, Honduras
  42. Forum Solidaridad Perú
  43. Foundation for Environmental Management and CampaignAgainst Poverty, Tanzania
  44. Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
  45. Friends of the Earth US
  46. Fundación Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (FARN)
  47. Fundación Constituyente XXI, Chile
  48. Gatef organizations, Egypt
  49. GCAP El Salvador
  50. GCAP Italia
  51. GCAP Rwanda Coalition
  52. German NGO Forum on Environment and Development
  53. Gestos (soropositividade, comunicação, gênero), Brazil
  54. Global Justice Now
  55. Global Learning for Sustainability, Uganda
  56. Global Responsibility (AG Globale Verantwortung)
  57. GreenTech Foundation, Bangladesh
  58. GreenWatch Dhaka, Bangladesh
  59. Group of Action, Peace and Training for Transformation – GAPAFOT, Central African Republic
  60. GWEN Trust, Zimbabwe
  61. Help Age, India
  62. Institute for Public Policy Research, Namibia
  63. Instituto de Estudos Socioeconomicos, Brazil
  64. Instituto Equit – Genero, Economia e Cidadania Global,Brazil
  65. Instituto Guatemalteco de Economistas, Guatemala
  66. Iraqi center for women rehabilitation & employment, Iraq
  67. Iraqi Institute for the Civil Development(IICD), Iraq
  68. Jubilee Debt Campaign -UK
  69. JUBILEO 2OOO RED ECUADOR
  70. U.L.U.- Women and Developmennt, Denmark
  71. Kathak Academy (KA)
  72. Kulmiye Aid Foundation, Somalia
  73. Lanka Fundamental Rights Organization, Sri Lanka
  74. Marikana youth development organisation, South Africa
  75. Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop, Guatemala
  76. Myanmar Youth foundation for SDG, Myanmar
  77. National Association of Professional Environmentalists(NAPE), Uganda
  78. National Campaign for Sustainable Development Nepal
  79. National Confederation of Dalit and Adivasi Organisations (NACDAOR), India
  80. National Labour Academy, Nepal
  81. National Society of Conservationists – Friends of the Earth Hungary
  82. NCD Alliance in Georgia
  83. Nepal Development Initiative (NEDI), Nepal
  84. Network of Journalists Living with HIV (JONEHA), Malawi
  85. New Millennium Women Empowerment Organization, Ethiopia
  86. NGO Federation of Nepal
  87. Nkoko Iju Africa, Kenya
  88. Observatorio Mexicano de la Crisis, Mexico
  89. Okoa Uchumi Campaign, Kenya
  90. ONG Cooperación y Desarrollo, Guinea Ecuatorial
  91. ONG Espoir Pour Tous, Côte d’Ivoire
  92. Ong FEED, Niger
  93. ONG PADJENA, Benin
  94. ONG Santé et Action Globale, Togo
  95. Organisation des Femmes Aveugles du Bénin
  96. Pakistan Development Alliance
  97. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  98. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  99. Pakistan Kissan Rabita Committee
  100. Peoples Development Institute, Phillippines
  101. POSCO-Agenda 2030 Senegal
  102. PROGRÈS SOCIAUX, Benin
  103. Rapad Maroc, Morocco
  104. REACHOUT SALONE, Sierra Leone
  105. REBRIP – Rede Brasileira pela Integração dos Povos, Brazil
  106. Recourse, The Netherlands
  107. Red Dot Foundation Global, USA
  108. Red Dot Foundation, India
  109. Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio (RMALC)
  110. RENICC Nicaragua
  111. RIHRDO (Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource Development Organization )
  112. Rural Area Development Programme (RADP), Nepal
  113. Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource development Organization (RIHRDO), Pakistan
  114. SAFE EMPOWERED COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATION ZAMBIA
  115. Sisters of Charity Federation
  116. Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre, Tanzania
  117. Solidarité des femmes pour le Développement intégral (SOFEDI), R. D. Congo
  118. Somali Youth Development Foundation (SYDF), Somalia
  119. Sorouh for Sustainable Development Foundation-SSDF, Iraq
  120. Stamp Out Poverty
  121. State Employees Federation, Mauritius
  122. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, India
  123. SYNAPECOCI, Côte d’Ivoire
  124. Tanzania Coalition on Debt and Development (TCDD)
  125. Tax Justice Network US
  126. The Institute for Social Accountability, Kenya
  127. The Mango Tree, Kenya
  128. The Rural Sector Public Institution CBO and Affiliated Entity’s With Multiple Distinct Components, Bangladesh
  129. Toto Centre Initiative, Kenya
  130. Treat Every Environment Special Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
  131. Uganda Peace Foundation
  132. UIMS, Iraq
  133. UndebtedWorld, Greece
  134. Union des Amis Socio Culturels d’Action en Developpement (UNASCAD), Haiti
  135. Uso Inteligente ASV A.C., México
  136. VEILLE CITOYENNE TOGO
  137. Wada Na Todo Abhiyan, India
  138. WEED – World Economy, Ecology & Development e.V.
  139. Western Kenya LBQT Feminist Forum (Lets Be Tested Queens CBO)
  140. WIPGG Nigeria
  141. WomanHealth Philippines
  142. Women in Democracy and Governance (WIDAG), Kenya
  143. Working With Women, Cameroun
  144. WREPA, Kenya
  145. Za Zemiata, Friends of the Earth Bulgaria
  146. Zukunftskonvent Germany
  147. منظمة حواد للاغاثة والتنمية

 

ACADEMIA / INVESTIGADORES

  1. Ahmad Mahdavi, University of Tehran/ and Sustainable agriculture and environment
  2. Albert Gyan, Social Advocate (African Diaspora)
  3. Annina Kaltenbrunner, Leeds University Business School UK
  4. Brenda Awuor Odongo, Researcher on SRHR and Reproductive health
  5. Claudio Schuftan, Researcher on human rights
  6. Daniel Bradlow, Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law
  7. Daniel Ortega-Pacheco, Center for Public Policy Development, ESPOL Polytechnic University, Ecuador
  8. Adamu Abdullazeez Bako, Centre for Citizens Rights
  9. Elisa Van Waeyenberge, SOAS University of London
  10. Frances Stewart, University of Oxford
  11. Gabriele Koehler, Researcher on 2030 Agenda eco-eco-social state, Germany
  12. Gerry Helleiner, Prof. emeritus, Economics, University of Toronto
  13. Grupo de Investigación en Derechos Colectivos y Ambientales GIDCA, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
  14. Ilene Grabel, Distinguished University Professor, Josef Korbel School of International Studies
  15. Jorge Manuel Gil, Cátedra libre pensamiento latinoamericano, UNPSJB
  16. Kevin P Gallagher, Global Development Policy Center, Boston University, USA
  17. Lena Dominelli, University of Southampton, UK
  18. María José Lubertino Beltrán, Profesora de Derechos Humanos, Universidad de Buenos Aires
  19. Martin S. Edwards, Seton Hall University, School of Diplomacy and International Relations
  20. Matthew Martin, Development Finance International
  21. Michel Aglietta, emeritus professor in economics, Centre for Prospective Studies and International Information CEPII
  22. Nora Fernández Mora, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
  23. Oscar Ugarteche, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas, México
  24. Remco van de Pas, Researcher on public health at ITM
  25. Rick Rowden, Lecturer, American University in Washington DC
  26. Rungani Aaron, Researcher, Zimbabwe
  27. Sandra Janice Misiribi, Good Health Community Project
  28. Shem Atuya Ayiera, ST. HEMMINGWAYS NGO
  29. Spyros Marchetos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  30. Viktor Chistyakov, Columbia University

 


 

Lettre ouverte aux ministres des Finances et aux gouverneurs des banques centrales du G20 et au FMI : les organisations de la société civile appellent à des principes pour une distribution équitable des droits de tirage spéciaux

Alors que la pandémie exacerbe de multiples crises dans les pays en développement, les droits de tirage spéciaux (DTS) sont une option cruciale pour aider à financer la réponse à la COVID-19 et accélérer une reprise économique équitable et inclusive. La distribution des DTS étant proportionnelle aux quotes-parts des pays du FMI, la nouvelle allocation de 650 milliards de dollars américains ne garantit pas que suffisamment de DTS aillent aux pays en développement. C’est pourquoi beaucoup ont réclamé une allocation de l’ordre de 3 000 milliards de dollars américains. De plus, les économies avancées ont moins besoin de DTS étant donné leur accès à un éventail plus large d’outils monétaires et financiers pour la réponse à la Covid-19 et la reprise. Ainsi, il est essentiel que l’allocation récente soit rapidement suivie d’une réorientation d’une part importante des DTS des économies avancées vers les pays en développement.

Nous sommes fermement convaincus qu’une reprise réussie et équitable dépend de la transparence et d’un processus participatif incluant la société civile dans tous les pays. Cela s’applique aussi aux espaces internationaux prenant des décisions sur les mécanismes de distribution des DTS, notamment le G20 et le FMI, où la société civile n’a pas eu, jusqu’à présent, suffisamment d’occasions de s’engager sur cette question.

Nous vous exhortons à veiller à ce que les options de distribution des DTS s’alignent sur un cadre de principes de base que de nombreux universitaires, experts et collègues de la société civile du monde entier ont évoqué ces derniers mois.

LES OPTIONS DE DISTRIBUTION DOIVENT :

  1. Fournir un financement sans dette, afin qu’il n’ajoute pas au fardeau de la dette insoutenable des pays en développement, dont les paiements annuels de la dette publique extérieure devraient atteindre en moyenne 300 milliards de dollars américains en 2021 et 2022. Le financement sous forme de dons est idéal mais, si des prêts supplémentaires doivent être offerts, une concessionnalité maximale est alors essentielle (pas d’intérêts perçus et des conditions offrant de longues périodes de remboursement avec des délais de grâce prolongés).
  2. S’abstenir de lier les transferts à des conditionnalités de politiques (directement ou indirectement). La conditionnalité allongera le temps de négociation de tels financements, et pourrait contraindre les pays à adopter des mesures d’ajustement ou d’austérité difficiles, ou mettre le financement hors de portée des pays incapables de se conformer à de telles conditions.
  3. Être accessible aux pays à revenu intermédiaire. Ces pays ont été constamment exclus des initiatives d’allégement de la dette et des discussions sur le financement concessionnel, et ne devraient pas être exclus d’une autre option d’assistance financière, alors que nombre d’entre eux sont confrontés à un surendettement profond et à des vulnérabilités pandémiques difficiles.
  1. Inclure des garanties de transparence et de responsabilité, à la fois pour les fournisseurs et les bénéficiaires de tels financements dans l’esprit de l’appropriation démocratique, en renforçant les contrôles indépendants, la participation citoyenne et la responsabilité envers les citoyens.
  2. Veiller à ce que les contributions aux DTS s’ajoutent aux engagements existants en matière d’APD et de financement climatique. Seuls les DTS acheminés vers les pays en développement sous forme de dons devraient être comptabilisés dans l’APD ou, le cas échéant, dans l’objectif de financement climatique de 100 milliards de dollars américains.
  3. Donner la priorité à l’utilisation des DTS qui élargissent le financement au travers de dons internationaux, pour lutter contre la pandémie par le biais d’un soutien budgétaire aux services publics et aux travailleurs du secteur public dans les domaines de la santé et de l’éducation, pour la protection sociale et d’autres besoins. Les dons peuvent également cibler la promotion d’une reprise équitable qui soutient la justice climatique et s’attaque aux inégalités économiques et entre les genres, notamment le fardeau des soins non rémunérés que les femmes supportent, ainsi que la pandémie exacerbée de la COVID-19.

Nous appelons également à un accord sur un référentiel mondial pour rendre compte des DTS acheminés. Cela contribuera à limiter la fragmentation et constituera une mesure importante pour une plus grande responsabilisation au regard des engagements et un suivi de l’impact global des DTS, notamment en vue d’un apprentissage continu.

Nous sommes conscients que la Facilité pour la réduction de la pauvreté et la croissance (FRPC) est considérée comme une option privilégiée pour la distribution des DTS, cependant, il est important de noter que la FRPC ne reflète pas les principes d’une absence de dette et de conditionnalité, qui soit accessible à tous les pays en développement. Nous vous exhortons à envisager des moyens d’améliorer l’option FRPC, notamment la distribution via son véhicule de financement d’urgence (facilité de crédit rapide).

Nous vous encourageons également à identifier les mécanismes de distribution des DTS qui soutiennent l’annulation de la dette, notamment par le biais du Fonds fiduciaire pour le confinement et les secours en cas de catastrophe, et à envisager d’autres options qui s’alignent au mieux sur les principes énoncés ci-dessus.

Pour créer des options permettant d’accroître les volumes de distribution des DTS et de cibler davantage de pays en développement, nous vous encourageons à discuter sérieusement d’options alternatives au-delà de la FRPC et au-delà du FMI plus largement. Cependant, d’autres véhicules de redistribution en discussion, tels que le Fonds « Résilience et Durabilité » et les banques multilatérales de développement, semblent encore loin d’incarner ces principes.

Nous vous encourageons également à identifier les mécanismes de distribution des DTS qui soutiennent l’annulation de la dette, notamment par le biais du Fonds fiduciaire pour le confinement et l’aide aux catastrophes (CCRT), et à envisager d’autres options qui répondent le mieux aux principes énoncés ci-dessus.

Enfin, ni l’allocation initiale de DTS ni l’acheminement des DTS ne peuvent se substituer à la mise en œuvre urgente de mesures d’allégement de la dette dont doivent bénéficier les pays à revenu faible et les pays à revenu intermédiaire, notamment pour garantir que les ressources supplémentaires ne sont pas affectées au remboursement des créanciers privés externes et d’autres créanciers.

Si vous souhaitez ajouter votre signature, veuillez remplir ce formulaire: https://forms.gle/BFsUMjQPTLdxokiL9

 

Signataires initiaux:

REGIONAL / GLOBAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. Access to Human Rights International AHRI
  2. Action Aid International
  3. ACTIONS PLURIELLES
  4. Advocacy Initiative for Development (AID)
  5. Africa Network for Environment and Economic Justice(ANEEJ)
  6. African Forum and Network on Debt and Development AFRODAD
  7. African Women’s Development and Communication Network(FEMNET)
  8. AidWatch Canada
  9. Alliance for Sustainable Development Organization (ASDO)
  10. Arab Watch Coalition
  11. Associated Country Women of the World
  12. Association Biowa
  13. AULA TIDEs UN SDGs Action Education & Programming
  14. Blue Ridge Impact Consulting
  15. Both ENDS
  16. Bretton Woods Project
  17. Burundi Rugby League Rugby a XIII Cooperative, Central & East Africa
  18. Campaign for Human Rights and Development International CHRDI, Sierra Leone West Africa
  19. Campaña Latinoamericana por el Derecho a la Educación (CLADE)
  20. Candid Concepts Development
  21. Caritas Ghana
  22. Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR)
  23. Christian Aid
  24. Civil Society Action Coalition on Education for All
  25. Coalition for Health Workers (HRH PLUS)
  26. Confederation of Indonesia People Movement (KPRI)
  27. Coordinadora de Organizaciones de Desarrollo
  28. DAWN (Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era)
  29. Derecho Ambiente y Recursos Naturales DAR
  30. Development Alternatives
  31. Diverse Voices and Action (DIVA) for Equality
  32. Ekumenická akademie (Ecumenical Academy)
  33. Equidad de Género: Ciudadanía, Trabajo y Familia
  34. Estonian Roundtable for Development Cooperation
  35. European Network on Debt and Development EURODAD
  36. Feminist Task Force
  37. FENASSEP/ISP, SINERGIE DES TRAVAILLEURS DU TOGO/STT
  38. Fight Inequality Alliance
  39. Fight Inequality Alliance, Asia
  40. Financial Transparency Coalition
  41. FOKUS – Forum for Women and Development
  42. Fundacion para Estudio e Investigacion de la Mujer
  43. Fundación para la Democracia Internacional
  44. Fundacion SES
  45. Gender and Development Network
  46. Génération Maastricht
  47. Geneva Finance Observatory
  48. Global Campaign for Education
  49. Global Coalition Against Poverty GCAP
  50. Global Policy Forum
  51. Global Socio-economic and Financial Evolution Network (GSFEN)
  52. Global Youth Online Union
  53. Health Action International Asia Pacific
  54. Indigenous Peoples Global Forum for Sustainable Development, (International Indegeous Platforme)
  55. Institute for Economic Justice
  56. Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Loreto Generalate
  57. Internacional de Servicios Públicos (ISP)
  58. International Council for Adult Education
  59. International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific (IWRAW Asia Pacific)
  60. Jubilee Debt Campaign
  61. Jubilee USA Network
  62. Ladies of Great Decorum
  63. Latin American Network for Economic and Social Rights -LATINDADD
  64. Latinoamérica Sustentable
  65. Medicus Mundi Mediterrània
  66. Medicusmundi spain
  67. Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate
  68. Mumahhid Family of Greater Jerusalem
  69. MY World Mexico
  70. NGO CSW LAC
  71. Okogun Odigie Safewomb International Foundation (OOSAIF)
  72. OXFAM
  73. Plateforme française Dette et Développement (PFDD)
  74. Red de Justicia Fiscal para América Latina y El Caribe RJFALC
  75. Regions Refocus
  76. RIPESS
  77. SAUDI GREEN BUILDING FORUM
  78. Save the Children
  79. SEATINI
  80. SEDRA, Chile
  81. Seed Global Health
  82. Servicios Ecumenios para Reconciliacion y Reconstuccion
  83. Sisters of Charity Federation
  84. Social Justice in Global Development
  85. Society for International Development SID
  86. Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future
  87. Stop the Bleeding Campaign
  88. Success Capital Organisation
  89. The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation
  90. Third World Network
  91. Tripla Difesa Onlus ODV
  92. UDA LLP
  93. UGANDA DEBT NETWORK
  94. UNISC International
  95. Unite for Climate Action
  96. United Religions Initiative
  97. WaterAid
  98. Wemos
  99. Womankind
  100. Women Coalition for Agenda 2030
  101. World Future Council
  102. World Public Health Nutrition Association
  103. Zamara Foundation

 

NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. AbibiNsroma Foundation, Ghana
  2. Academic and Career Development Initiative, Cameroon
  3. Africa Development Interchange Network (ADIN), Cameroon
  4. Alliance Sud, Switzerland
  5. Al-Tahreer Association for Development, Iraq
  6. American TelePhysicians, USA
  7. Apostle Padi Ologo Traditional Birth Centre, Ghana
  8. Asociación Ciudadana por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina
  9. Association for Promotion Sustainable Development, India
  10. Association of Rural Education and Development Service, India
  11. Baghdad Women Association, Iraq
  12. Bahrain Transparency
  13. Budget Advocacy Network, Sierra Leone
  14. Catholic Agency for Overseas Development CAFOD, UK
  15. CCFD-Terre Solidaire
  16. CDES, Ecuador
  17. CEDECAM, Nicaragua
  18. Cedetrabajo, Colombia
  19. CEICOM, El Salvador
  20. Center for Economic and Policy Research, CEPR
  21. Centre for Environmental Justice, Sri Lanka
  22. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  23. CLATE/ULATOC/CTA-A, España
  24. Club Ohada Thies, Senegal
  25. CNCD-11.11.11
  26. Comisión Nacional de Enlace
  27. Community Working Group on Health (CWGH), Zimbabwe
  28. Conservation and Development Agency CODEA-CBO, Uganda
  29. Consumer Unity and Trust Society (CUTS), Zambia
  30. Cooperation for Peace and Development (CPD), Afghanistan
  31. Corporación CIASE
  32. Debt Justice Norway
  33. Campaña por la Expresión ciudadana
  34. DSW Kenya
  35. Economic Justice Network Sierra Leone
  36. EMPOWER INDIA
  37. ENVIRONICS TRUST, India
  38. de
  39. Fair Trade Hellas, Greece
  40. Fomento de la Vida- FOVIDA, Peru
  41. Foro Social de Deuda Externa y Desarrollo de Honduras – FOSDEH, Honduras
  42. Forum Solidaridad Perú
  43. Foundation for Environmental Management and CampaignAgainst Poverty, Tanzania
  44. Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
  45. Friends of the Earth US
  46. Fundación Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (FARN)
  47. Fundación Constituyente XXI, Chile
  48. Gatef organizations, Egypt
  49. GCAP El Salvador
  50. GCAP Italia
  51. GCAP Rwanda Coalition
  52. German NGO Forum on Environment and Development
  53. Gestos (soropositividade, comunicação, gênero), Brazil
  54. Global Justice Now
  55. Global Learning for Sustainability, Uganda
  56. Global Responsibility (AG Globale Verantwortung)
  57. GreenTech Foundation, Bangladesh
  58. GreenWatch Dhaka, Bangladesh
  59. Group of Action, Peace and Training for Transformation – GAPAFOT, Central African Republic
  60. GWEN Trust, Zimbabwe
  61. Help Age, India
  62. Institute for Public Policy Research, Namibia
  63. Instituto de Estudos Socioeconomicos, Brazil
  64. Instituto Equit – Genero, Economia e Cidadania Global,Brazil
  65. Instituto Guatemalteco de Economistas, Guatemala
  66. Iraqi center for women rehabilitation & employment, Iraq
  67. Iraqi Institute for the Civil Development(IICD), Iraq
  68. Jubilee Debt Campaign -UK
  69. JUBILEO 2OOO RED ECUADOR
  70. U.L.U.- Women and Developmennt, Denmark
  71. Kathak Academy (KA)
  72. Kulmiye Aid Foundation, Somalia
  73. Lanka Fundamental Rights Organization, Sri Lanka
  74. Marikana youth development organisation, South Africa
  75. Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop, Guatemala
  76. Myanmar Youth foundation for SDG, Myanmar
  77. National Association of Professional Environmentalists(NAPE), Uganda
  78. National Campaign for Sustainable Development Nepal
  79. National Confederation of Dalit and Adivasi Organisations (NACDAOR), India
  80. National Labour Academy, Nepal
  81. National Society of Conservationists – Friends of the Earth Hungary
  82. NCD Alliance in Georgia
  83. Nepal Development Initiative (NEDI), Nepal
  84. Network of Journalists Living with HIV (JONEHA), Malawi
  85. New Millennium Women Empowerment Organization, Ethiopia
  86. NGO Federation of Nepal
  87. Nkoko Iju Africa, Kenya
  88. Observatorio Mexicano de la Crisis, Mexico
  89. Okoa Uchumi Campaign, Kenya
  90. ONG Cooperación y Desarrollo, Guinea Ecuatorial
  91. ONG Espoir Pour Tous, Côte d’Ivoire
  92. Ong FEED, Niger
  93. ONG PADJENA, Benin
  94. ONG Santé et Action Globale, Togo
  95. Organisation des Femmes Aveugles du Bénin
  96. Pakistan Development Alliance
  97. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  98. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  99. Pakistan Kissan Rabita Committee
  100. Peoples Development Institute, Phillippines
  101. POSCO-Agenda 2030 Senegal
  102. PROGRÈS SOCIAUX, Benin
  103. Rapad Maroc, Morocco
  104. REACHOUT SALONE, Sierra Leone
  105. REBRIP – Rede Brasileira pela Integração dos Povos, Brazil
  106. Recourse, The Netherlands
  107. Red Dot Foundation Global, USA
  108. Red Dot Foundation, India
  109. Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio (RMALC)
  110. RENICC Nicaragua
  111. RIHRDO (Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource Development Organization )
  112. Rural Area Development Programme (RADP), Nepal
  113. Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource development Organization (RIHRDO), Pakistan
  114. SAFE EMPOWERED COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATION ZAMBIA
  115. Sisters of Charity Federation
  116. Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre, Tanzania
  117. Solidarité des femmes pour le Développement intégral (SOFEDI), R. D. Congo
  118. Somali Youth Development Foundation (SYDF), Somalia
  119. Sorouh for Sustainable Development Foundation-SSDF, Iraq
  120. Stamp Out Poverty
  121. State Employees Federation, Mauritius
  122. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, India
  123. SYNAPECOCI, Côte d’Ivoire
  124. Tanzania Coalition on Debt and Development (TCDD)
  125. Tax Justice Network US
  126. The Institute for Social Accountability, Kenya
  127. The Mango Tree, Kenya
  128. The Rural Sector Public Institution CBO and Affiliated Entity’s With Multiple Distinct Components, Bangladesh
  129. Toto Centre Initiative, Kenya
  130. Treat Every Environment Special Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
  131. Uganda Peace Foundation
  132. UIMS, Iraq
  133. UndebtedWorld, Greece
  134. Union des Amis Socio Culturels d’Action en Developpement (UNASCAD), Haiti
  135. Uso Inteligente ASV A.C., México
  136. VEILLE CITOYENNE TOGO
  137. Wada Na Todo Abhiyan, India
  138. WEED – World Economy, Ecology & Development e.V.
  139. Western Kenya LBQT Feminist Forum (Lets Be Tested Queens CBO)
  140. WIPGG Nigeria
  141. WomanHealth Philippines
  142. Women in Democracy and Governance (WIDAG), Kenya
  143. Working With Women, Cameroun
  144. WREPA, Kenya
  145. Za Zemiata, Friends of the Earth Bulgaria
  146. Zukunftskonvent Germany
  147. منظمة حواد للاغاثة والتنمية

 

ACADEMICS / RESEARCHERS

  1. Ahmad Mahdavi, University of Tehran/ and Sustainable agriculture and environment
  2. Albert Gyan, Social Advocate (African Diaspora)
  3. Annina Kaltenbrunner, Leeds University Business School UK
  4. Brenda Awuor Odongo, Researcher on SRHR and Reproductive health
  5. Claudio Schuftan, Researcher on human rights
  6. Daniel Bradlow, Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law
  7. Daniel Ortega-Pacheco, Center for Public Policy Development, ESPOL Polytechnic University, Ecuador
  8. Adamu Abdullazeez Bako, Centre for Citizens Rights
  9. Elisa Van Waeyenberge, SOAS University of London
  10. Frances Stewart, University of Oxford
  11. Gabriele Koehler, Researcher on 2030 Agenda eco-eco-social state, Germany
  12. Gerry Helleiner, Prof. emeritus, Economics, University of Toronto
  13. Grupo de Investigación en Derechos Colectivos y Ambientales GIDCA, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
  14. Ilene Grabel, Distinguished University Professor, Josef Korbel School of International Studies
  15. Jorge Manuel Gil, Cátedra libre pensamiento latinoamericano, UNPSJB
  16. Kevin P Gallagher, Global Development Policy Center, Boston University, USA
  17. Lena Dominelli, University of Southampton, UK
  18. María José Lubertino Beltrán, Profesora de Derechos Humanos, Universidad de Buenos Aires
  19. Martin S. Edwards, Seton Hall University, School of Diplomacy and International Relations
  20. Matthew Martin, Development Finance International
  21. Michel Aglietta, emeritus professor in economics, Centre for Prospective Studies and International Information CEPII
  22. Nora Fernández Mora, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
  23. Oscar Ugarteche, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas, México
  24. Remco van de Pas, Researcher on public health at ITM
  25. Rick Rowden, Lecturer, American University in Washington DC
  26. Rungani Aaron, Researcher, Zimbabwe
  27. Sandra Janice Misiribi, Good Health Community Project
  28. Shem Atuya Ayiera, ST. HEMMINGWAYS NGO
  29. Spyros Marchetos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  30. Viktor Chistyakov, Columbia University

 


 

 

رسالة مفتوحة إلى وزراء مالية مجموعة العشرين ومحافظي البنوك المركزية وصندوق النقد الدولي: منظمات المجتمع المدني تدعو إلى مبادئ التحويل العادل لحقوق السحب الخاصة

 

نظرًا لتفاقم الأزمات المتعددة في البلدان النامية بسبب إنتشار الوباء، فإن حقوق السحب الخاصة تعد خيارًا حاسمًا للمساعدة في تمويل الاستجابة لكورونا وتسريع التعافي الاقتصادي العادل والشامل. وبما أن توزيع حقوق السحب الخاصة يتناسب مع حصص البلدان في صندوق النقد الدولي، فإن التخصيص الجديد البالغ 650 مليار دولار أمريكي لا يضمن تخصيص حقوق سحب خاصة كافية للبلدان النامية. ولهذا السبب طالب الكثيرون بتخصيص 3 تريليون دولار أمريكي. علاوة على ذلك، فإن الاقتصادات المتقدمة في حاجة أقل إلى حقوق السحب الخاصة نظرًا لنفاذها إلى مجموعة واسعة من الأدوات النقدية والمالية للاستجابة لكورونا والتعافي. وبالتالي، من الضروري أن يُتبع التخصيص الأخير، سريعًا، بإعادة تحويل جزء كبير من حقوق السحب الخاصة التي حصلت عليها الدول المتقدمة إلى البلدان النامية.

نحن نؤمن بشكل راسخ بأن التعافي الناجح والمنصف هو رهن ضمان الشفافية والمسار التشاركي الذي تشمل المجتمع المدني في جميع البلدان. وينطبق هذا أيضًا على الفضاءات الدولية التي يُتّخذ فيها القرارات بشأن آليات توجيه حقوق السحب الخاصة، بما في ذلك مجموعة العشرين وصندوق النقد الدولي، حيث لم يكن لدى المجتمع المدني، حتى الآن، فرص كافية للمشاركة في هذه المسألة.
نحثكم على ضمان توافق خيارات تحويل حقوق السحب الخاصة مع الإطار الأساسي للمبادئ التي رددها العديد من الأكاديميين والخبراء والزملاء من المجتمع المدني حول العالم خلال الأشهر الأخيرة.

يجب أن تكون خيارات التوجيه تجب أن تكون على الشكل التالي:

  1. توفير تمويل خالٍ من الديون، بحيث لا يضيف إلى أعباء الديون غير المستدامة على عاتق البلدان النامية، التي يُتوقع أن يصل متوسط ​​مدفوعات الدين العام الخارجي فيها إلى 300 مليار دولار أمريكي خلال عامي 2021 و 2022. في هذا الإطار، يشكل التمويل من خلال المنح خيارًا مثاليًا، ولكن إذا كانت هناك قروض إضافية من المقرر تقديمها ، فمن المهم جدًا أن تكون هذه القروض ميسّرة الى أقصى حد (صفر فائدة وشروط سداد طويلة مع فترات سماح ممتدة).
  2. الامتناع عن ربط التحويلات بمشروطيات سياساتية (بشكل مباشر أو غير مباشر). ستؤدي المشروطية الى إطالة الوقت المستغرق للتفاوض على مثل هكذا تمويل، وقد تجبر البلدان على اعتماد تدابير تكييف أو تقشف صعبة؛ أو جعل التمويل بعيدًا عن متناول البلدان غير القادرة على الامتثال لهذه الشروط.
  3. أن تكون في متناول البلدان ذات الدخل المتوسط. وتم استبعاد هذه البلدان بشكل مستمر من مبادرات تخفيف عبء الديون والتمويل الميسر، ولا يجب استبعادها مجددًا من فرصة أخرى للمساعدة المالية عندما يواجه العديد منها ضائقة ديون عميقة وتحدّيات الهشاشة المرتبطة بالجائحة
  4. . ضمان الشفافية والمساءلة من كلا الجهتين، مقدمي هذا التمويل ومتلقيه، بالاستناد على روحية الملكية الديمقراطية، وتعزيز الرقابة المستقلة والمشاركة والمساءلة أمام المواطنين.
  5. ضمان أن تكون مساهمات حقوق السحب الخاصة إضافة إلى التزامات المساعدة الإنمائية الرسمية وتمويل المناخ، لا بديل عنها. وحدها حقوق السحب الخاصة المحوّلة إلى البلدان النامية على شكل منح هي التي يجب أن تُحسب كمساعدة إنمائية رسمية، أو عند الاقتضاء يمكن اعتبارها مساهة لهدف تمويل المناخ البالغ 100 مليار دولار أمريكيز
  6. إعطاء الأولوية لاستخدام حقوق السحب الخاصة التي توسع التمويل الدولي عبر المنح لمكافحة الوباء من خلال دعم الموازنة العامة لتمويل الخدمات العامة ودعم القوى العاملة في القطاع العام في الصحة والتعليم، من أجل الحماية الاجتماعية والاحتياجات الأخرى. يمكن أن تستهدف المنح أيضًا تعزيز التعافي العادل الذي يدعم العدالة المناخية ، ويتصدى لعدم المساواة الاقتصادية والجندرية ، بما في ذلك عبء الرعاية دون أجر الذي تتحمله النساء وتفاقم جائحة كورونا.

كما ندعو إلى الاتفاق على مخزن عالمي للإبلاغ وتقديم التقارير عن حقوق السحب الخاصة الموجهة. سيساعد ذلك في الحد من التجزئة وسيكون مقياسًا مهمًا للمساءلة عن الالتزامات وتتبع التأثير العام لحقوق السحب الخاصة، بما في ذلك التعلم المستمر.

نحن ندرك أن “الصندوق الاستئماني للنمو والحد من الفقر” يُنظر إليه كخيار مفضل لتحويل حقوق السحب الخاصة؛ ومع ذلك ، من المهم الإشارة الى أن “الصندوق الاستئماني للنمو والحد من الفقر” لا يعكس المبادئ أعلاه الت تنص على أن يكون التحويل خاليًا من الديون، وخاليًا من المشروطيات، ومتاحًا لجميع البلدان النامية. لذلك، نحثكم على النظر في وسائل تحسين خيار “الصندوق الاستئماني للنمو والحد من الفقر”، بما في ذلك التحويل عبر وسيلة التمويل الطارئة الخاصة بالصندوق (التسهيل الائتماني السريع).

نحثكم أيضًا على تحديد آليات تحويل حقوق السحب الخاصة التي تدعم إلغاء الديون، بما في ذلك من خلال “صندوق احتواء الكوارث والإغاثة” ، والنظر في الخيارات البديلة التي تتوافق بشكل أفضل مع المبادئ المذكورة أعلاه.

بهدف خلق خيارات لزيادة أحجام تحويل حقوق السحب الخاصة وولكي تصل إلى المزيد من البلدان النامية ، نشجعكم على مناقشة الخيارات البديلة بجدية التي تذهب أبعد من نطاق “الصندوق الاستئماني للنمو والحد من الفقر”، وصندوق النقد الدولي على نطاق أوسع. وبالرغم من ذلك ، لا تزال أدوات إعادة التحويل الأخرى قيد المناقشة، مثل إنشاء صندوق ائتماني للمرونة والاستدامة وبنوك التنمية متعددة الأطراف، بعيدة كل البعد عن تجسيد هذه المبادئ.

أخيرًا ، لا يمكن أن يكون التخصيص الأساسي  لحقوق السحب الخاصة ولا تحويلها بديلاً عن التنفيذ العاجل لتدابير تخفيف عبء الديون التي تعود بالفائدة على البلدان ذات الدخل المتوسط والمتدني، لا سيما لضمان عدم توجيه هذه الموارد الإضافية لسداد الديون الخارجية الخاصة وتلك العائدة لدائنين آخرين.

:الموقعون الأوليون

 

SIGNATORIES

REGIONAL / GLOBAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. Access to Human Rights International AHRI
  2. Action Aid International
  3. ACTIONS PLURIELLES
  4. Advocacy Initiative for Development (AID)
  5. Africa Network for Environment and Economic Justice(ANEEJ)
  6. African Forum and Network on Debt and Development AFRODAD
  7. African Women’s Development and Communication Network(FEMNET)
  8. AidWatch Canada
  9. Alliance for Sustainable Development Organization (ASDO)
  10. Arab Watch Coalition
  11. Associated Country Women of the World
  12. Association Biowa
  13. AULA TIDEs UN SDGs Action Education & Programming
  14. Blue Ridge Impact Consulting
  15. Both ENDS
  16. Bretton Woods Project
  17. Burundi Rugby League Rugby a XIII Cooperative, Central & East Africa
  18. Campaign for Human Rights and Development International CHRDI, Sierra Leone West Africa
  19. Campaña Latinoamericana por el Derecho a la Educación (CLADE)
  20. Candid Concepts Development
  21. Caritas Ghana
  22. Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR)
  23. Christian Aid
  24. Civil Society Action Coalition on Education for All
  25. Coalition for Health Workers (HRH PLUS)
  26. Confederation of Indonesia People Movement (KPRI)
  27. Coordinadora de Organizaciones de Desarrollo
  28. DAWN (Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era)
  29. Derecho Ambiente y Recursos Naturales DAR
  30. Development Alternatives
  31. Diverse Voices and Action (DIVA) for Equality
  32. Ekumenická akademie (Ecumenical Academy)
  33. Equidad de Género: Ciudadanía, Trabajo y Familia
  34. Estonian Roundtable for Development Cooperation
  35. European Network on Debt and Development EURODAD
  36. Feminist Task Force
  37. FENASSEP/ISP, SINERGIE DES TRAVAILLEURS DU TOGO/STT
  38. Fight Inequality Alliance
  39. Fight Inequality Alliance, Asia
  40. Financial Transparency Coalition
  41. FOKUS – Forum for Women and Development
  42. Fundacion para Estudio e Investigacion de la Mujer
  43. Fundación para la Democracia Internacional
  44. Fundacion SES
  45. Gender and Development Network
  46. Génération Maastricht
  47. Geneva Finance Observatory
  48. Global Campaign for Education
  49. Global Coalition Against Poverty GCAP
  50. Global Policy Forum
  51. Global Socio-economic and Financial Evolution Network (GSFEN)
  52. Global Youth Online Union
  53. Health Action International Asia Pacific
  54. Indigenous Peoples Global Forum for Sustainable Development, (International Indegeous Platforme)
  55. Institute for Economic Justice
  56. Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Loreto Generalate
  57. Internacional de Servicios Públicos (ISP)
  58. International Council for Adult Education
  59. International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific (IWRAW Asia Pacific)
  60. Jubilee Debt Campaign
  61. Jubilee USA Network
  62. Ladies of Great Decorum
  63. Latin American Network for Economic and Social Rights -LATINDADD
  64. Latinoamérica Sustentable
  65. Medicus Mundi Mediterrània
  66. Medicusmundi spain
  67. Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate
  68. Mumahhid Family of Greater Jerusalem
  69. MY World Mexico
  70. NGO CSW LAC
  71. Okogun Odigie Safewomb International Foundation (OOSAIF)
  72. OXFAM
  73. Plateforme française Dette et Développement (PFDD)
  74. Red de Justicia Fiscal para América Latina y El Caribe RJFALC
  75. Regions Refocus
  76. RIPESS
  77. SAUDI GREEN BUILDING FORUM
  78. Save the Children
  79. SEATINI
  80. SEDRA, Chile
  81. Seed Global Health
  82. Servicios Ecumenios para Reconciliacion y Reconstuccion
  83. Sisters of Charity Federation
  84. Social Justice in Global Development
  85. Society for International Development SID
  86. Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future
  87. Stop the Bleeding Campaign
  88. Success Capital Organisation
  89. The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation
  90. Third World Network
  91. Tripla Difesa Onlus ODV
  92. UDA LLP
  93. UGANDA DEBT NETWORK
  94. UNISC International
  95. Unite for Climate Action
  96. United Religions Initiative
  97. WaterAid
  98. Wemos
  99. Womankind
  100. Women Coalition for Agenda 2030
  101. World Future Council
  102. World Public Health Nutrition Association
  103. Zamara Foundation

 

NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS

  1. AbibiNsroma Foundation, Ghana
  2. Academic and Career Development Initiative, Cameroon
  3. Africa Development Interchange Network (ADIN), Cameroon
  4. Alliance Sud, Switzerland
  5. Al-Tahreer Association for Development, Iraq
  6. American TelePhysicians, USA
  7. Apostle Padi Ologo Traditional Birth Centre, Ghana
  8. Asociación Ciudadana por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina
  9. Association for Promotion Sustainable Development, India
  10. Association of Rural Education and Development Service, India
  11. Baghdad Women Association, Iraq
  12. Bahrain Transparency
  13. Budget Advocacy Network, Sierra Leone
  14. Catholic Agency for Overseas Development CAFOD, UK
  15. CCFD-Terre Solidaire
  16. CDES, Ecuador
  17. CEDECAM, Nicaragua
  18. Cedetrabajo, Colombia
  19. CEICOM, El Salvador
  20. Center for Economic and Policy Research, CEPR
  21. Centre for Environmental Justice, Sri Lanka
  22. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  23. CLATE/ULATOC/CTA-A, España
  24. Club Ohada Thies, Senegal
  25. CNCD-11.11.11
  26. Comisión Nacional de Enlace
  27. Community Working Group on Health (CWGH), Zimbabwe
  28. Conservation and Development Agency CODEA-CBO, Uganda
  29. Consumer Unity and Trust Society (CUTS), Zambia
  30. Cooperation for Peace and Development (CPD), Afghanistan
  31. Corporación CIASE
  32. Debt Justice Norway
  33. Campaña por la Expresión ciudadana
  34. DSW Kenya
  35. Economic Justice Network Sierra Leone
  36. EMPOWER INDIA
  37. ENVIRONICS TRUST, India
  38. de
  39. Fair Trade Hellas, Greece
  40. Fomento de la Vida- FOVIDA, Peru
  41. Foro Social de Deuda Externa y Desarrollo de Honduras – FOSDEH, Honduras
  42. Forum Solidaridad Perú
  43. Foundation for Environmental Management and CampaignAgainst Poverty, Tanzania
  44. Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
  45. Friends of the Earth US
  46. Fundación Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (FARN)
  47. Fundación Constituyente XXI, Chile
  48. Gatef organizations, Egypt
  49. GCAP El Salvador
  50. GCAP Italia
  51. GCAP Rwanda Coalition
  52. German NGO Forum on Environment and Development
  53. Gestos (soropositividade, comunicação, gênero), Brazil
  54. Global Justice Now
  55. Global Learning for Sustainability, Uganda
  56. Global Responsibility (AG Globale Verantwortung)
  57. GreenTech Foundation, Bangladesh
  58. GreenWatch Dhaka, Bangladesh
  59. Group of Action, Peace and Training for Transformation – GAPAFOT, Central African Republic
  60. GWEN Trust, Zimbabwe
  61. Help Age, India
  62. Institute for Public Policy Research, Namibia
  63. Instituto de Estudos Socioeconomicos, Brazil
  64. Instituto Equit – Genero, Economia e Cidadania Global,Brazil
  65. Instituto Guatemalteco de Economistas, Guatemala
  66. Iraqi center for women rehabilitation & employment, Iraq
  67. Iraqi Institute for the Civil Development(IICD), Iraq
  68. Jubilee Debt Campaign -UK
  69. JUBILEO 2OOO RED ECUADOR
  70. U.L.U.- Women and Developmennt, Denmark
  71. Kathak Academy (KA)
  72. Kulmiye Aid Foundation, Somalia
  73. Lanka Fundamental Rights Organization, Sri Lanka
  74. Marikana youth development organisation, South Africa
  75. Movimiento Tzuk Kim-pop, Guatemala
  76. Myanmar Youth foundation for SDG, Myanmar
  77. National Association of Professional Environmentalists(NAPE), Uganda
  78. National Campaign for Sustainable Development Nepal
  79. National Confederation of Dalit and Adivasi Organisations (NACDAOR), India
  80. National Labour Academy, Nepal
  81. National Society of Conservationists – Friends of the Earth Hungary
  82. NCD Alliance in Georgia
  83. Nepal Development Initiative (NEDI), Nepal
  84. Network of Journalists Living with HIV (JONEHA), Malawi
  85. New Millennium Women Empowerment Organization, Ethiopia
  86. NGO Federation of Nepal
  87. Nkoko Iju Africa, Kenya
  88. Observatorio Mexicano de la Crisis, Mexico
  89. Okoa Uchumi Campaign, Kenya
  90. ONG Cooperación y Desarrollo, Guinea Ecuatorial
  91. ONG Espoir Pour Tous, Côte d’Ivoire
  92. Ong FEED, Niger
  93. ONG PADJENA, Benin
  94. ONG Santé et Action Globale, Togo
  95. Organisation des Femmes Aveugles du Bénin
  96. Pakistan Development Alliance
  97. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  98. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
  99. Pakistan Kissan Rabita Committee
  100. Peoples Development Institute, Phillippines
  101. POSCO-Agenda 2030 Senegal
  102. PROGRÈS SOCIAUX, Benin
  103. Rapad Maroc, Morocco
  104. REACHOUT SALONE, Sierra Leone
  105. REBRIP – Rede Brasileira pela Integração dos Povos, Brazil
  106. Recourse, The Netherlands
  107. Red Dot Foundation Global, USA
  108. Red Dot Foundation, India
  109. Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio (RMALC)
  110. RENICC Nicaragua
  111. RIHRDO (Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource Development Organization )
  112. Rural Area Development Programme (RADP), Nepal
  113. Rural Infrastructure and Human Resource development Organization (RIHRDO), Pakistan
  114. SAFE EMPOWERED COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATION ZAMBIA
  115. Sisters of Charity Federation
  116. Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre, Tanzania
  117. Solidarité des femmes pour le Développement intégral (SOFEDI), R. D. Congo
  118. Somali Youth Development Foundation (SYDF), Somalia
  119. Sorouh for Sustainable Development Foundation-SSDF, Iraq
  120. Stamp Out Poverty
  121. State Employees Federation, Mauritius
  122. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, India
  123. SYNAPECOCI, Côte d’Ivoire
  124. Tanzania Coalition on Debt and Development (TCDD)
  125. Tax Justice Network US
  126. The Institute for Social Accountability, Kenya
  127. The Mango Tree, Kenya
  128. The Rural Sector Public Institution CBO and Affiliated Entity’s With Multiple Distinct Components, Bangladesh
  129. Toto Centre Initiative, Kenya
  130. Treat Every Environment Special Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
  131. Uganda Peace Foundation
  132. UIMS, Iraq
  133. UndebtedWorld, Greece
  134. Union des Amis Socio Culturels d’Action en Developpement (UNASCAD), Haiti
  135. Uso Inteligente ASV A.C., México
  136. VEILLE CITOYENNE TOGO
  137. Wada Na Todo Abhiyan, India
  138. WEED – World Economy, Ecology & Development e.V.
  139. Western Kenya LBQT Feminist Forum (Lets Be Tested Queens CBO)
  140. WIPGG Nigeria
  141. WomanHealth Philippines
  142. Women in Democracy and Governance (WIDAG), Kenya
  143. Working With Women, Cameroun
  144. WREPA, Kenya
  145. Za Zemiata, Friends of the Earth Bulgaria
  146. Zukunftskonvent Germany
  147. منظمة حواد للاغاثة والتنمية

 

ACADEMICS / RESEARCHERS

  1. Ahmad Mahdavi, University of Tehran/ and Sustainable agriculture and environment
  2. Albert Gyan, Social Advocate (African Diaspora)
  3. Annina Kaltenbrunner, Leeds University Business School UK
  4. Brenda Awuor Odongo, Researcher on SRHR and Reproductive health
  5. Claudio Schuftan, Researcher on human rights
  6. Daniel Bradlow, Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law
  7. Daniel Ortega-Pacheco, Center for Public Policy Development, ESPOL Polytechnic University, Ecuador
  8. Adamu Abdullazeez Bako, Centre for Citizens Rights
  9. Elisa Van Waeyenberge, SOAS University of London
  10. Frances Stewart, University of Oxford
  11. Gabriele Koehler, Researcher on 2030 Agenda eco-eco-social state, Germany
  12. Gerry Helleiner, Prof. emeritus, Economics, University of Toronto
  13. Grupo de Investigación en Derechos Colectivos y Ambientales GIDCA, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
  14. Ilene Grabel, Distinguished University Professor, Josef Korbel School of International Studies
  15. Jorge Manuel Gil, Cátedra libre pensamiento latinoamericano, UNPSJB
  16. Kevin P Gallagher, Global Development Policy Center, Boston University, USA
  17. Lena Dominelli, University of Southampton, UK
  18. María José Lubertino Beltrán, Profesora de Derechos Humanos, Universidad de Buenos Aires
  19. Martin S. Edwards, Seton Hall University, School of Diplomacy and International Relations
  20. Matthew Martin, Development Finance International
  21. Michel Aglietta, emeritus professor in economics, Centre for Prospective Studies and International Information CEPII
  22. Nora Fernández Mora, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
  23. Oscar Ugarteche, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas, México
  24. Remco van de Pas, Researcher on public health at ITM
  25. Rick Rowden, Lecturer, American University in Washington DC
  26. Rungani Aaron, Researcher, Zimbabwe
  27. Sandra Janice Misiribi, Good Health Community Project
  28. Shem Atuya Ayiera, ST. HEMMINGWAYS NGO
  29. Spyros Marchetos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  30. Viktor Chistyakov, Columbia University

Comparte en redes sociales

Deja una respuesta

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada.